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Watch these videos of Rich's Stage Show:
Rich Pearl's Stage Show
The stage is dark. Suddenly the audience hears something that does not quite fit: a banjo playing Latin music? The spotlight flashes across the stage, but almost not fast enough to catch the performer who is dancing, making eyes at the ladies in the audience and playing the banjo all at the same time. Richard Pearl is the name of this athletic banjoist--all teeth, eyes, curly hair, an impish smile and movement, however, not in typical flashy banjo attire but in an elegant tuxedo.

Contents
The show highlights songs not associated with the banjo. To prove the point, Pearl launches into a medley of marches, movie scores, children's tunes, dances, sing-a-longs, classical pieces and cartoon themes. Flying fingers show how a 37 minute routine is performed comedically in six minutes.

Continuing with comedy, Pearl reminds the audience about the $5,000 they spent on their kids' piano lessons and proceeds to play the parents' most hated songs, the only three the kids ever learned; The effect of imitating amateurish piano playing on the banjo is funny and the audience roars with laughter but subsides with amazement when "Chopsticks" goes ragtime.

Just when It appears that he will play a standard banjo piece, "Dueling Banjos," Pearl takes it around the the world with his instrument sounding like a mandolin for the Italian version and changing into a bazouki for "Zorba the Greek." There is something for everyone, with Polish, Israeli and Chinese versions. Requests from the audience take the musical travelers from Ireland to Australia with stops in Europe and Russia.

Swapping his banjo for a ukelele, the instrumentalist continues the unusual show by playing "The 12th Street Rag" on the uke. He adds the college professor touch (Pearl was a professor of marketing for seven years) by describing the ukelele's origins, not in Hawaii but in Portugese sailing ships where the small instrument fit well. Halfway through the song, Pearl turns the uke upside down and continues playing, delighting the audience with his musical gymnastics.

Pearl continues with the unusual by starting the band and jumping on a stool for a classical concert set to a disco beat-- "Hooked on the Banjo!" Never before have many in the audience heard a banjo playing such classical/disco tunes as "Flight of the Bumble Bee," "Can-Can," William Tell Overture (Lone Ranger)," and "Brahms' Lullaby" and ending with "America the Beautiful."

For his finale on the banjo, the lights dim, Pearl sits on a stool and, with just a spotlight, announces that he will finally play a traditional banjo tune, "The Tiger Rag," the song which brought jazz to the world. Fingers fly over the four strings and murmurs build to cheers as the performer plays "Hold that tiger!" and ends with a thunderous, virtuostic finale.

During the performance, the audience has laughed, has been taken around the world and back in time, has heard unusual musical creations and has been made to feel a part of the show by this entertainer with a magnetic personality. In the end, they have been truly amazed at the music which came from fingers which hardly seem to touch the strings.

Richard Pearl Performance Description

  • Complete musical arrangements for the band -- or tape accompaniment -- for two totally different performances in any show situation.
  • A modular format allows Rich to tailor his show to almost any producer's demands.
  • Modern electronics enables this unusual banjoist to leave the mike and, with the electrified wireless banjo, he can play from the stage or take his performance to the people.

Richard Pearl will:

  • Dazzle the audience with his comedic instrumental show-- a wonderful foundation for any vocalist.
  • Include lively vocals-- to build an audience's enthusiasm for a following comedian.
  • Provide a total evening's enjoyment-- with performances on three instruments and a wide variety of comedic musical material.

Just a small sample:

  • Dueling Banjos Around the World (is a mandolin? a bazouki?)
  • Count Along with Rich -- marches, dances, children's songs, classical music, cartoons, sing-a-long -- In six minutes!
  • "Hooked on the Banjo" -- the classics go disco.
  • "The Orange Blossom Special" -- see the U.S.A.
  • "The Tiger Rag" -- a show stopper!
  • "The 12th Street Rag" -- ukelele gymnastics.
  • Audience participation -- old standbys.
  • Banjo "Chopsticks."
  • Latin and rock & roll on the banjo.

Please see below for more information and a complete press kit.


Resume

Richard Pearl
Stage Show Performer

Pearl Productions
36 Clark Street
Brooklyn, NY 11201
(718) 596-1422 
Instruments
Banjo, Guitar, Ukelele
HOTELS · CONVENTIONS · CONCERTS · FAIRS
TRADE SHOWS · SHIPPING LINES · PROMOTIONS

Specialties
Comedic Novelty Numbers, Dixieland Jazz, Classical, Country & Western, Audience Participation, Latin

Special Guest Performer With
Rich Little, Regis Philbin, Morey Amsterdam, Carol Channing, Donald O'Connor
Norm Crosby, Pat Paulsen, Jerry Vale, Al Martino, Julie Budd

Stage Show Performance Highlights

Hotels
John Asuaga's Nugget, NV
Balsams, NH 
Palm Springs Riviera, CA
Mount Washington. NH
Kutsherts, NY 
Shrine Temple, IN 
Queen Elizabeth, QUE. 
Mount Airy Lodge, PA 
Grossinger's, NY 
Tamiment, PA
Shipping Lines
Cunard 
Princess 
Regency 
Chandris 
NAC

Concerts
Ruth Eckerd Hall, FL 
Boston City Hall, MA 
Barbara Mann Performing Arts
 Center, FL Brighton Beach Park, NY Waterloo Festival, NJ
Tours
Major Florida East and West Coast
 Condo Circuit California Trade Show Circuit U.S.O. Far East and Alaska Indiana State Fair York Fair

Conventions
Metropolitan Life Insurance · United Steelworkers · Mobil Oil · Paper Industry Management Association · New England Association of Police Chiefs · US National Bureau of standards · National Truckers Association · NJ Association of CPAs · Hilton Executive convention · National fraternal organizations (Elks, Moose)


Biography

Richard Pearl was not a child prodigy. Piano and trumpet lessons took second place to baseball while he was growing up on the East coast, from New York to Florida. Today a virtuostic "multi-instrumentalist," on banjo, ukelele, guitar and bass, he was a late starter, not playing any musical instrument seriously before entering college. His performances with commercial rock bands paid the tuition at Pace University. After graduation, no longer wanting to play rock and roll guitar, he bought a hock shop banjo, taught himself to play, and was hired at The Red Garter in New York. Later, as the band leader, he toured the united states and Europe with his own group.

Completing his Master's Degree {MBA} at Pace University, this multi-talented banjoist taught marketing at Montclair and Jersey City state Colleges for seven years while developing a night club act. During this time, he utilized his engineering background to make his act even more effective by designing a wireless banjo. This permits him to move about the stage, or bring his performance directly into the audience.
Listen to some music from Rich's CD

Pearl is regularly featured as the special guest performer with such stars as Rich Little, Regis Philbin, Morey Amsterdam, JoAnn Castle, Pat Paulsen and Norm Crosby. He has entertained diverse audiences in conventions, concerts, hotels and cruise ships from Montreal to the Mediterranean, and from New York to the Far East.

When not on the road this "Renaissance man" invents new procedures to make his performance even more enjoyable. His banjo is now completely wireless, without even the telltale pocket transmitter. When no band is available, he uses a perfected taped accompaniment controlled by foot pedals, which give this version of his show maximum flexibility. From playing to promotion, all instruments, equipment, TVs, VCRs and his car reflect the Pearl magic touch.


Press Release

The stage is dark. Suddenly the audience hears something that does not quite fit: a banjo playing Latin music? The spotlight flashes across the stage, but almost not fast enough to catch the performer who is dancing, making eyes at the ladies in the audience and playing the banjo all at the same time. Richard Pearl is the name of this athletic banjoist — all teeth, eyes, curly hair, an impish smile and movement; however, not in typical flashy banjo attire but in an elegant tuxedo.

The show highlights songs not associated with the banjo. To prove the point, Pearl launches into a medley of marches, movie scores, children's tunes, dances, sing-a-longs, classical pieces and cartoon themes. Flying fingers show how a 37 minute routine is performed comedically in six minutes.

Continuing with comedy, Pearl reminds the audience about the $5,000 they spent on their kids' piano lessons and proceeds to play the parents' most hated songs, the only three the kids ever learned. The effect of imitating amateurish piano playing on the banjo is funny and the audience roars with laughter but subsides with amazement when "Chopsticks" goes ragtime.

Just when it appears that he will play a standard banjo piece, "Duelling Banjos," Pearl takes it around the world with his instrument sounding like a mandolin for the Italian version and changing into a bazouki for "Zorba the Greek." There is something for everyone, with Polish, Israeli and Chinese versions. Requests from the audience take the musical travelers from Ireland to Australia with stops in Europe and Russia.

Swapping his banjo for a ukelele, the instrumentalist continues the unusual show by playing "The 12th street Rag" on the uke. He adds the college professor touch (Pearl was a professor of marketing for seven years) by describing the ukelele's origins, not in Hawaii but in Portugese sailing ships where the small instrument fit well. Halfway through the song, Pearl turns the uke upside down and continues playing; delighting the audience with his musical gymnastics.

Pearl continues with the unusual by starting the band and jumping on a stool for a classical concert set to a disco beat – "Hooked on the Banjo!" Never before have many in the audience heard a banjo playing such classical/disco tunes as "Flight of the Bumble Bee," "Can-Can," "William Tell Overture (Lone Ranger)," and "Brahms' Lullaby" and ending with "America the Beautiful."

For his finale on the banjo, the lights dim, Pearl sits on a stool and, with just a spotlight, announces that he will finally play a traditional banjo tune, "The Tiger Rag," the song which brought jazz to the world. Fingers fly over the four strings and murmurs build to cheers as the performer plays "Hold that tiger!" and ends with a thunderous, virtuostic finale.

During the performance, the audience has laughed, has been taken around the world and back in time, has heard unusual musical creations and has been made to feel a part of the show by this entertainer with a magnetic personality. In the end they have been truly amazed at the music which came from fingers which hardly seem to touch the strings.

 
All Contents Copyright © Richard Pearl